A Practical Guide for Medical Teachers 5th Edition

A Practical Guide for Medical Teachers 5th EditionThe Fifth Edition of the highly praised Practical Guide for Medical Teachers provides a bridge between the theoretical aspects of medical education and the delivery of enthusiastic and effective teaching in basic science and clinical medicine.

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Healthcare professionals are committed teachers and this book is an essential guide to help them maximise their performance.

  • This highly regarded book recognises the importance of educational skills in the delivery of quality teaching in medicine.
  • The contents offer valuable insights into all important aspects of medical education today.
  • A leading educationalist from the USA joins the book’s editorial team.
  • The continual emergence of new topics is recognised in this new edition with nine new chapters: The role of patients as teachers and assessors; Medical humanities; Decision-making; Alternative medicine; Global awareness; Education at a time of ubiquitous information; Programmative assessment; Student engagement; and Social accountability.
  • An enlarged group of authors from more than 15 countries provides both an international perspective and a multi-professional approach to topics of interest to all healthcare teachers.

A Practical Guide for Medical Teachers 5th Edition

by Dent MMEd MD FHEA FRCSEd, John (Editor), Harden OBE MD FRCP(Glas) FRCSEd FRCPC, Ronald M (Editor), Hunt MD MBA, Dan (Editor)

ISBN-13: 978-0702068911

ISBN-10: 9780702068911


A Practical Guide for Medical Teachers 5th Edition – Content

Instructions for online access
Cover image
Title Page
Copyright
Foreword
Preface
Contributors
Section 1 Curriculum Development
Chapter 1 New horizons in medical education
Summary
References
4
Chapter 2 Curriculum planning and development
Introduction
What is a curriculum?
Summary
References
Chapter 3 The undergraduate curriculum
Introduction
Forces shaping the curriculum
Critical components of the undergraduate medical education programme as they
relate to the continuum of medical education
Summary
References
Chapter 4 Postgraduate medical education
Introduction
Functions of PGME and postgraduate trainees in a healthcare system
Transitions in PGME
Models of PGME
Teaching, learning and assessment in PGME
External assessment in PGME: summative, certification
PGME quality, accreditation and CQI
Controversies in PGME
The future of PGME
Summary
References
5
Chapter 5 Continuing professional development
Background
How clinicians learn
Assessment and evaluation
Summary
References
Chapter 6 The hidden curriculum
Historical context
Definitions and metaphors
Applications: exploring/assessing the hidden curriculum
Student mistreatment: a case study in applying the HC lens
Summary
References
Section 2 Learning Situations
Chapter 7 Lectures
Lectures in medical teaching
Pros and cons of lectures as a primary learning event
Learning in a lecture environment
Organizing a lecture
Teaching materials
Active learning in the lecture hall
The flipped classroom
6
Summary
References
Chapter 8 Learning in small groups
What is a small group?
When to use small groups?
How to effectively conduct a small-group teaching session
Evaluating (assessing) the small-group session
Evaluation of small-group teaching and participation
Summary
Further information
Chapter 9 Learning with patients
Introduction
The ‘learning triad’
Educational strategies for bedside teaching
Strategies for inpatients
Strategies for outpatients
Educational strategies applicable to all clinical settings
Hospital ward opportunities – models for managing learning in the ward
Ambulatory care opportunities
Assessment of bedside learning
Staff development
Summary
References
7
Chapter 10 Learning in the community
Introduction
What is community-based medical education?
Goals of CBME
Practical principles for successful CBME
Summary
References
Further reading
Chapter 11 Learning in rural and remote locations
Introduction
Before the learner arrives
The first day
During the rotation
Assessment and wrap-up
Troubled and troubling learners
Summary
Acknowledgements
References
Chapter 12 Learning in longitudinal integrated clerkships
Introduction
Definition
History
Rationale
8
Model types
Strengths of LICs
Challenges of LICs
Future visions
Summary
References
Chapter 13 Learning in a simulated environment
Introduction
Background
Simulation as design
Simulated patients
Simulated patient methodology and trends in medical education
Fundamental concepts in simulated patient methodology
Discourses of clinical competence
Scope of SP practice
Hybrid simulations
Patients’ voices
Qualities of simulated patients
Supporting simulated patients in role portrayal and feedback
Simulation technology
Hybrid simulators
Current and future trends
Simulation in the twenty-first century
Summary
9
References
Further reading and resources
Chapter 14 Distance education
Before you begin …
Introduction to the course
What is distance learning?
Technology and distance learning
Feedback
The structure of a distance learning text
Feedback
Providing students with feedback on learning
Blending different elements of the course
Managing clinical attachments by distance learning
Feedback
The student’s learning experience
Managing distance learning
Development of distance learning courses (Table 14.11)
Quality assurance in distance learning
Feedback
Conclusion
References
Further reading
Section 3 Educational Strategies and Technologies
10
Chapter 15 Outcome-based education
A move from process to product
The trend towards OBE
Why the move to OBE?
Implementation of OBE
Implementing OBE
Myths about OBE
Summary
References
Chapter 16 Integrated learning
Introduction
Some definitions
Rationale for integrated learning
Strategies for integrated learning
Barriers to integrated learning
Integrated student assessment
Summary
References
Chapter 17 Interprofessional education
Definitions
History
The rationale for IPE
11
Curriculum development
Learning activities
Assessment
Post-qualification
Impact and effectiveness of IPE
Faculty development for IPE
Overcoming challenges
Summary
References
Chapter 18 Problem-based learning
Perspectives in problem-based learning
Creating PBL courses: a systems perspective
Writing PBL cases
Running PBL small groups
Faculty as tutor
Evaluating PBL session outcomes
PBL controversies
Outcomes of PBL courses
Reasons to consider using a PBL approach
General disadvantages of small-group learning
Specific disadvantages of PBL as a learning format
Issues with PBL as an educational methodology
Issues with students
Issues with tutors
12
Active learning beyond the PBL format – expanding the educator toolbox
Summary
Reference
Further reading
Chapter 19 Team-based learning
What is team-based learning?
How does TBL work?
What does a TBL session look like?
What are the ingredients for a successful TBL module?
Why does TBL work?
What can go wrong with TBL?
Is TBL worth the effort?
Summary
References
Online resources
Chapter 20 Using digital technologies
Introduction
The digital technology repertoire
Using technology in medical education
Why use digital technology?
Technology and instructional design
Mobile technologies
Preparing for e-health
13
Hidden curriculum and digital technologies
Digital professionalism
The role of the medical e-teacher
Summary
References
Further reading
Chapter 21 Instructional design
Introduction
The ADDIE model
The universe of ID models
Examples of ID models
Summary
References
Section 4 Curriculum Themes
Chapter 22 Basic sciences and curriculum outcomes
Introduction
The changing medical curriculum
Authentic learning in basic science courses
The active learning environment
Use of reflective practice, critical thinking and clinical reasoning
Innovations in teaching basic sciences
Basic science integration throughout the curriculum
14
Nontraditional discipline-independent skills
Learning basic science outside curricular structure
Summary
References

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A Practical Guide for Medical Teachers 5th Edition – Foreword

It is an honour to provide the foreword to this fine book, the fifth edition of what has become a trusted companion for medical educators. This revised edition brings new chapters and introduces new authors who will inspire a
wide international audience. Recent years have seen a greater focus in medical schools on social sciences and medical humanities, increased attention to social accountability and globalization, widespread uptake of
longitudinal integrated clerkships and recognition of the importance of student engagement. All of these topics have been included in this new edition, creating an indispensable resource at a time of considerable change.

The medical education literature is enormous and can be daunting. This book serves as a place to start and a source to dip into for support and wisdom. It has a decidedly international flavor, given its team of over one hundred authors from fourteen countries. In our globalizing world, students, educators as well as practices traverse borders quickly. Yet resources are unevenly available to those who carry the responsibility of education, making a trusted single source valuable….

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