Advances in Pulmonary Medicine: Research and Innovations (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology) 1st ed. 2019 Edition

Advances in Pulmonary Medicine: Research and Innovations 1st ed. 2019 EditionThis book discusses a wide range of investigations and practice-oriented advances in pulmonary medicine and critical care. Pulmonary diseases are a major cause of hospitalization and mortality, affecting millions of people worldwide.

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Addressing a range of topics, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sleep apnea, and lung cancer, the book offers insights into the disease mechanisms and risk factors, along with practical aspects concerning the maintenance of quality of life, adherence to therapy, and palliative treatment and care.

Further, it explores diagnostic and treatment approaches to respiratory dysfunction and respiratory failure, highlighting the beneficial effects of good sleep quality in chronic pulmonary conditions and lung transplant patients. The book also presents novel experimental research on the cellular voltage-gated sodium channels in the mechanism of pathological cough, which is particularly relevant for future targeted antitussive therapy. Lastly, it addresses the epidemiological aspects of pulmonary infections.

As such, this book is a valuable resource for medical scholars, clinicians, family physicians, and other professionals seeking to improve the management of respiratory diseases.

Advances in Pulmonary Medicine: Research and Innovations 1st ed. 2019 Edition
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Neuroscience and Respiration
Volume 1160
Series Editor
by Mieczyslaw Pokorski (Editor)
Opole Medical School
Opole, Poland
ISBN-13: 978-3030210984
ISBN-10: 3030210987

Advances in Pulmonary Medicine: Research and Innovations 1st ed – Contents

Lidocaine, a Non–selective Inhibitor of Voltage-Gated
Sodium Channels, Blocks Chemically-Induced Cough
in Awake Naïve Guinea Pigs ………………………… 1
Simona Svajdova, Tomas Buday, and Mariana Brozmanova
Quality of Life in Patients with Advanced Non-Small-Cell
Lung Cancer Receiving Palliative Chemotherapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Cyryl Daroszewski, Małgorzata Stasiewicz,
Ewa Jaźwińska-Tarnawska, Anna Rachwalik, Ewa Mura,
Joanna Luboch-Kowal, Andrzej Dryś, Zdzisław A. Bogucki,
and Anna Brzecka
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Platelet Count . . . . . . 19
Szymon Skoczyński, Damian Krzyżak, Aleksandra Studnicka,
Maciej Ogonowski, Ewelina Tobiczyk, Grzegorz Brożek,
Władysław Pierzchała, and Adam Barczyk
Influence of Sleep-Disordered Breathing on Quality of Life
and Exercise Capacity in Lung Transplant Recipients . . . . . . . . . . 25
Frederike Kruse, Bjoern E. Kleibrink, Thomas Rabis, Yi Wang,
Gerhard Weinreich, Markus Kamler, Christian Taube, Kurt Rasche,
and Urte Sommerwerck
Anthropometric Factors in the Assessment of Obstructive
Sleep Apnea Risk in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome . . . . . . . . . 35
M. Tażbirek, J. Potoczny, K. Strójwąs, W. Pierzchała,
and A. Barczyk
Sleep Disorders and Adherence to Inhalation Therapy
in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease . . . . . . . . 43
Mariusz Chabowski, Judyta Łuczak, Krzysztof Dudek,
and Beata Jankowska-Polańska
Noninvasive Ventilation-Facilitated Bronchofiberoscopy
in Patients with Respiratory Failure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Szymon Skoczyński, Łukasz Minarowski, Ewelina Tobiczyk,
Aleksandra Oraczewska, Klaudia Glinka, Karolina Ficek,
Robert Mróz, and Adam Barczyk
vii
Atypical and Typical Bacteria in Children with Community
Acquired Pneumonia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
A. Jama-Kmiecik, M. Frej-Mądrzak, J. Sarowska,
D. Teryks-Wołyniec, A. Skiba, and I. Choroszy-Król
Epidemiology of Pulmonary Aspergillosis in Hospitalized
Patients in Poland During 2009–2016 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Patryk Tarka, Aneta Nitsch-Osuch, Paweł Gorynski, Piotr Tyszko,
Magdalena Bogdan, and Krzysztof Kanecki
Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation for Accessory
Respiratory Muscles Training in Patients After Ischemic Stroke . . . 81
Lucyna Slupska, Tomasz Halski, Małgorzata Żytkiewicz,
Kuba Ptaszkowski, Robert Dymarek, Jakub Taradaj,
and Malgorzata Paprocka-Borowicz
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93

Advances in Pulmonary Medicine: Research and Innovations 1st ed

Lidocaine, a Non–selective Inhibitor of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels, Blocks Chemically-Induced Cough
in Awake Naïve Guinea Pigs

Simona Svajdova, Tomas Buday, and Mariana Brozmanova

Abstract
Pathological cough is an unwanted and debilitating symptom of a range of chronic respiratory diseases. Currently used antitussive therapies are ineffective and act largely through the central nervous system, having a number of
dangerous adverse effects.

There is an urgent need for new, better peripherally acting antitussive drugs with minimal adverse effects. Significant progress has recently been achieved in the understanding of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs), which points to the biological plausibility that blocking specific NaV sybtypes (NaV1.1 – NaV1.9) in the airway sensory nerves may lead to the inhibition of pathological coughing. In this study we investigated the
effect of lidocaine, a non–selective NaVs blocker, on citric acid– and capsaicin–induced cough in the awake naïve guinea pig experimental model.

We found that pre–inhalation followed by continuous inhalation of nebulized lidocaine (10 mM) during citric
acid (0.8 M) cough challenge was effective in suppressing the cough response (number of coughs, median [IQR]) – (5 [3.8–6.3] pre–lidocaine vs. 1 [0.3–3.8] post–lidocaine; p ¼ 0.002, n ¼ 11). Likewise, lidocaine during capsaicin
(50 μM) cough challenge reduced the number of coughs (6 [4.1–7.9] pre–lidocaine vs. 1 [0.5–1.5] post–lidocaine; p ¼ 0.0005, n ¼ 12).

We conclude that nebulized lidocaine effectively blocks chemically induced cough. These findings lend support to the notion that NaVs may become a novel neural target in antitussive treatment.

Keywords
Chemically-induced cough · Capsaicin · Citric
acid · Cough · Guinea pig · Lidocaine ·
Voltage-gated sodium channels

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