An International Perspective on Disasters and Children’s Mental Health (Integrating Psychiatry and Primary Care) 1st ed. 2019 Edition

An International Perspective on Disasters and Children's Mental Health 1st ed. 2019 EditionThis book provides a broad international perspective on the psychological trauma faced by children and adolescents exposed to major disasters, and on the local public health response to their needs.

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An outstanding quality of the book is that it draws upon the experience of local researchers, clinicians, and public mental health practitioners who dedicated themselves to these children in the wake of overwhelming events.

The chapters address exemplary responses to a wide variety of trauma types, including severe weather, war, industrial catastrophes, earthquakes, and terrorism. Because disasters do not recognize geographic, economic, or political boundaries, the chapters have been selected to reflect the diverse global community’s attempt to respond to vulnerable children in the most challenging times.

The book, thus, examines a diverse range of healthcare systems, cultural settings, mental health infrastructure, government policies, and the economic factors that have played an important role in responses to traumatic events. The ultimate goal of this book is to stimulate future international collaborations and interventions that will promote children’s mental health in the face of disaster.

An International Perspective on Disasters and Children’s Mental Health 1st ed. 2019 Edition
by Christina W. Hoven (Editor), Lawrence V. Amsel (Editor), Sam Tyano (Editor)
ISBN-13: 978-3030158712
ISBN-10: 3030158713

An International Perspective on Disasters and Children’s Mental Health 1st ed. 2019 Edition Contents

Part I Children in Disasters: An Overview
1 The Impact of Trauma on the Fetus, the Infant, and the Child . . . . . . 3
Miri Keren and Sam Tyano
2 Public Health Responses and Therapeutic Interventions . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Joy D. Osofsky, Tonya C. Hansel, Howard J. Osofsky,
and Anthony H. Speier
Part II Terrorism
3 Boko Haram Insurgency and Nigeria’s Mental Health Response . . . . 45
Jibril Omuya Abdulmalik, Asmau Mohammed Chubado Dahiru,
Mohammed Said Jidda, Musa Abba Wakil,
and Olayinka Olusola Omigbodun
4 The Army Public School Massacre in Peshawar, Pakistan . . . . . . . . . . 63
Khalid A. Mufti, Ali Ahsan Mufti, and Michaeline Bresnahan
5 Children’s Mental Health After 9/11 and the Boston
Marathon Bombing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Jonathan S. Comer, Alejandra Golik, and Julio Martin
Part III Earthquakes and Tsunamis
6 Chilean Children 7 Years After the 2010 Earthquake
and Tsunami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Marcelo Leiva-Bianchi, Andrea Araneda, Andrés Fresno, and
Rosario Spencer
7 Children’s Exposure to China’s Wenchuan Earthquake:
Mental Health Sequelae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Ya Zhou, Fang Fan, and Yuanyuan Li
8 Children’s Mental Health Following the Haiti 2010 Earthquake . . . . . 147
Judite Blanc and Ingrid van Balkom
Contents
xiv
Part IV Nuclear Events
9 Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident . . . . . . . . . 167
Hisako Watanabe, Shintaro Kikuchi, Kanae Narui,
Kimiko Toyoshima, Hiroko Suzuki, Natsuko Tokita,
and Michiko Sakai
10 Responses to Children’s Mental Health Needs
Following the Chernobyl Disaster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
Konstantin Nikolayevich Loganovsky and Tatiana Konstantinovna
Loganovskaya
11 Child and Adolescent Suicide Risk Following the
Chernobyl Disaster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
Vsevolod A. Rozanov
Part V Extreme Weather and Geography
12 Psychopathology in Children and Their Caregivers
Following America’s Hurricane Katrina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
Julianna Finelli and Charles H. Zeanah
13 Use of Geographic Information Systems in Trauma Research . . . . . . . 253
George J. Musa, William Keating, and Brian Brutzman
Part VI Parents and Children in Times of War
14 The Armenian Genocide and Its Intergenerational Effects . . . . . . . . . 273
Khachatur Gasparyan and John Saroyan
15 Promoting Mental Health for Children and Their
Caregivers Affected by the Syrian Conflict . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301
Aala El-Khani and Rachel Calam
16 The Intergenerational Aftermath of War Captivity:
The Israeli Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323
Jacob Y. Stein, Roy Aloni, Laura Crompton, Gadi Zerach,
and Zahava Solomon
Part VII Refugees and Human Rights
17 Children Seeking Asylum: Mental Health and Human Rights . . . . . . 343
Louise K. Newman
18 Children and Armed Conflict: A Child Rights-based
Approach to Prevention and Mitigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 363
Jeffrey Goldhagen, Sherry Shenoda, and Peter Dixon
Contents
xv
Part VIII Future Approaches
19 Preventing Future Terrorism: Intervening on
Youth Radicalization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391
Alana Siegel, Sophie Brickman, Zoe Goldberg,
and Ruth Pat-Horenczyk
20 Mass Disasters and Children’s Mental Health: How General
Systems Theory and Behavioral Economics Can Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . 419
Lawrence V. Amsel, Brian Brutzman, and Mythili Ananthasayan
Contents
xvii


About the Authors

Jibril Omuya Abdulmalik, MBBS, MSc, MSc, MSc, FWACP is a psychiatrist and senior lecturer in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. He is passionate about public mental health with a focus on mental health advocacy, stigma reduction, and improving access to mental health-care services in Nigeria. He is especially involved with providing services for underserved, vulnerable populations, such as children and adolescents, internally displaced persons, and prison inmates……


 

An International Perspective on Disasters and Children’s Mental Health 1st ed. 2019 Edition – Part I

Children in Disasters: An Overview

Miri Keren and Sam Tyano

Abstract

Pregnancy is one of the most vulnerable periods of life, both physically and emotionally. The effects of stress and trauma have a potential impact on a pregnant woman, as well as on her fetus and future child. Indeed, an increasing number of animal and human studies on the influences of stress on the developing fetal brain have produced evidence that prenatal maternal stress may have a long-term impact on a child’s mental health.

Post-traumatic stress disorder during pregnancy, whatever its origin, has a direct impact not only on a woman’s mental health (such as anxiety, depression, and suicidal behavior) but also on pregnancy outcomes, especially premature birth and spontaneous abortion. It may also have a significant impact on the early mother-infant relationship, which, in turn, is decisive in establishing the child’s personality and socio-emotional functioning.

Still, one needs to carefully differentiate between stressful events of different types and level of severity. In this chapter, we will review the impact of different types of trauma during pregnancy, including situations of intimate partner violence (IPV), war-related rape, other war-related conditions, pregnancy following a previous traumatic delivery, and natural catastrophes. We will show how variables, such as the timing, nature, and chronicity of the stressful and/or traumatic event, moderate the impact of stress on pregnancy outcomes……

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