Principles and Practice of Lifespan Developmental Neuropsychology (Cambridge Medicine) 1st Edition

Principles and Practice of Lifespan Developmental Neuropsychology 1st EditionLifespan developmental neuropsychology is the study of the systematic behavioral, cognitive, and psychosocial changes and growth that occur across infancy, adolescence, adulthood and later life. This book provides insight into how brain-behavior relationships change over time, how disorders differ in presentation across the lifespan, and what longer-term outcomes look like.

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Providing practical guidance in a succinct and accessible format, this book covers the most common neurodevelopmental, behavioral and cognitive disorders, including but not limited to ADHD, cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, and epilepsy.

Key points concerning the practice of developmental neuropsychology are emphasized in order to aid understanding of neuropsychological development and its impact on behavior, emotion, cognition, and social integration. This will be essential reading for advanced graduate students and early career professionals in the fields of neuropsychology, pediatric psychology, clinical psychology, school psychology, and rehabilitation psychology, as well as practitioners in the allied fields that interact with neuropsychology.

Principles and Practice of Lifespan Developmental Neuropsychology (Cambridge Medicine (Hardcover)) 1st Edition
by Jacobus Donders (Editor), Scott J. Hunter (Editor)
ISBN-13: 978-0521896221
ISBN-10: 0521896223

Principles and Practice of Lifespan Developmental Neuropsychology 1st Edition – Contents

Contact information for authors page vii
Biography for Jacobus Donders and Scott J. Hunter xi

Introduction
Jacobus Donders and Scott J. Hunter 1
Section I: Theory and models 3
1 A lifespan review of developmental
neuroanatomy
John Williamson 3
2a Developmental models in pediatric
neuropsychology
Jane Holmes Bernstein 17
2b Models of developmental neuropsychology:
adult and geriatric
Tyler J. Story and Deborah K. Attix 41
3 Multicultural considerations in lifespan
neuropsychological assessment
Thomas Farmer and Clemente Vega 55
4 Structural and functional neuroimaging
throughout the lifespan
Brenna C. McDonald and Andrew J. Saykin 69
Section II: Disorders 83
5a Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
in children and adolescents
David Marks, Joey Trampush and Anil Chacko 83
5b Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
in adults
Margaret Semrud-Clikeman and Jodene
Goldenring Fine 97
5c Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder:
a lifespan synthesis
Jeffrey M. Halperin, Anne-Claude V. Bedard and
Olga G. Berwid 113
6a Learning disorders in children and adolescents
Gregory M. Stasi and Lori G. Tall 127
6b Learning disorders in adults
Elizabeth P. Sparrow 143
6c Synthesis of chapters on learning disabilities:
overview and additional perspectives
H. Lee Swanson 163
7a Infants and children with spina bifida
Heather B. Taylor, Susan H. Landry, Lianne
English and Marcia Barnes 169
7b Adolescence and emerging adulthood in
individuals with spina bifida: a developmental
neuropsychological perspective
Kathy Zebracki, Michael Zaccariello, Frank
Zelko and Grayson N. Holmbeck 183
7c Spina bifida/myelomeningocele and
hydrocephalus across the lifespan:
a developmental synthesis
Ilana Gonik, Scott J. Hunter and Jamila
Cunningham 195
8 Cerebral palsy across the lifespan
Seth Warchausky, Desiree White and Marie
Van Tubbergen 205
9a Intellectual disability across the lifespan
Bonnie Klein-Tasman and Kelly Janke 221
9b Lifespan aspects of PDD/autism spectrum
disorders (ASD)
Julie M. Wolf and Sarah J. Paterson 239
9c Autism spectrum disorders and intellectual
disability: common themes and points
of divergence
Marianne Barton, Colby Chlebowski and
Deborah Fein 251
10a Hearing loss across the lifespan:
neuropsychological perspectives
Betsy Kammerer, Amy Szarkowski and Peter
Isquith 257
10b Visual impairment across the lifespan:
neuropsychological perspectives
Lisa M. Noll and Lana L. Harder 277
11a Traumatic brain injury in childhood
Michael W. Kirkwood, Keith Owen Yeates and
Jane Holmes Bernstein 299
11b Adult outcomes of pediatric traumatic
brain injury
Miriam Beauchamp, Julian Dooley and Vicki
Anderson 315
11c Neurobehavioral aspects of traumatic brain
injury sustained in adulthood
Tresa Roebuck-Spencer, James Baños, Mark
Sherer and Thomas Novack 329
11d Traumatic brain injury in older
adults
Felicia C. Goldstein and Harvey
S. Levin 345
11e Traumatic brain injury across the
lifespan: a long-term developmental
perspective
Jacobus Donders 357
12a Pediatric aspects of epilepsy
Lindsey Felix and Scott J. Hunter 359
12b A lifespan perspective of cognition in
epilepsy
Michael Seidenberg and Bruce Hermann 371
13a Leukemia and lymphoma across the lifespan
Kevin R. Krull and Neelam Jain 379
13b Lifespan aspects of brain tumors
Celiane Rey-Casserly 393
14 Lifespan aspects of endocrine disorders
Geoffrey Tremont, Jennifer Duncan Davis and
Christine Trask 409
15 Metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders
across the lifespan
Richard Ziegler and Elsa Shapiro 427
16a Psychopathological conditions in children
and adolescents
Abigail B. Sivan 449
16b Psychopathological conditions in adults
Anthony C. Ruocco, Elizabeth Kunchandy
and Maureen Lacy 455
16c Neuropsychological aspects of
psychopathology across the lifespan:
a synthesis
Alexandra Zagoloff and Scott J. Hunter 469
Index 477
The color plates are to be found between pp. 276
and 277


Principles and Practice of Lifespan Developmental Neuropsychology 1st Edition – Contact information for authors

Vicki Anderson, Ph.D.
Department of Psychology
Royal Children’s Hospital
Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Deborah K. Attix, Ph.D.
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC
James Baños, Ph.D., ABPP-Cn
Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
University of Alabama, Birmingham
Birmingham, AL
Marcia Barnes, Ph.D.
Children’s Learning Institute
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
Houston, TX
Marianne Barton, Ph.D.
Department of Psychology
University of Connecticut
Storrs, CT
Miriam Beauchamp, Ph.D.
Department of Psychology
Royal Children’s Hospital
Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Anne-Claude V. Bedard, Ph.D.
Department of Psychiatry
Mount Sinai Medical Center
New York, NY
Jane Holmes Bernstein, Ph.D.
Neuropsychology Program
Children’s Hospital Boston
Department of Psychiatry
Harvard Medical School
Boston, MA
Olga G. Berwid, Ph.D.
Department of Psychiatry
Mount Sinai Medical Center
New York, NY
Anil Chako, Ph.D.
Department of Psychiatry
Mount Sinai Medical Center
New York, NY
Colby Chlebowski, M.A.
Department of Psychology
University of Connecticut
Storrs, CT
Jamila Cunningham, M.A.
Department of Psychology
Loyola University
Chicago, IL
Jennifer Duncan Davis, Ph.D.
Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University
Providence, RI
Jacobus Donders, Ph.D.
Department of Psychology
Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital
Grand Rapids, MI
Julian Dooley, Ph.D.
Murdoch Childrens Research Institute
Melbourne, Australia
Lianne English
Department of Psychology
University of Guelph
Guelph, Ontario, Canada
Thomas Farmer, Psy.D.
The Chicago School of Professional Psychology
Chicago, IL
Deborah Fein, Ph.D.
Department of Psychology
University of Connecticut
Storrs, CT
Lindsey Felix, Ph.D.
Alexian Brothers
Neuroscience Institute
Chicago, IL
Jodene Goldenring Fine, Ph.D.
Department of Psychiatry
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI
Felicia C. Goldstein, Ph.D.
Department of Neurology
Emory University School of Medicine and Wesley
Woods Center on Aging
Atlanta, GA
Ilana Gonik, Ph.D
Department of Psychiatry
Loyola University Medical Center
Maywood, IL
Jeffrey M. Halperin, Ph.D
Department of Psychology
Queens College, CUNY
Flushing, NY
Lana L. Harder, Ph.D.
Department of Psychiatry
University of Texas Southwestern Medical School
Children’s Medical Centre
Bruce Hermann, Ph.D.
Department of Neurology
University of Wisconsin Madison School of Medicine
Madison, WI
Grayson N. Holmbeck, Ph.D.
Department of Psychology
Loyola University of Chicago
Chicago, IL
Scott J. Hunter, Ph.D.
Departments of Psychiatry & Pediatrics
University of Chicago
Chicago, IL
Peter Isquith, Ph.D.
Department of Psychiatry
Dartmouth Medical School
Hanover, NH
Neelam Jain, Ph.D.
Department of Epidemiology and Cancer Control
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
Memphis, TN
Kelly Janke, M.A.
Department of Psychology
University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
Milwaukee, WI
Betsy Kammerer, Ph.D.
Deaf and Hard of Hearing Program
Children’s Hospital Boston
Waltham, MA
Michael W. Kirkwood, Ph.D.
Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
The Children’s Hospital
Aurora, CO
Bonnie Klein-Tasman, Ph.D.
Department of Psychology
University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
Milwaukee, WI
Kevin R. Krull, Ph.D.
Department of Epidemiology and Cancer
Control
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
Memphis, TN
Elizabeth Kunchandy, Ph.D.
Rehabilitation Care Service
VA – Pudget Sound
Seattle, WA
Maureen Lacy, Ph.D.
Department of Psychiatry
University of Chicago
Chicago, IL
Susan H. Landry, Ph.D.
The University of Texas Health Science Center
Department of Pediatrics
Children’s Learning Institute
Houston, TX
Harvey S. Levin, Ph.D.
Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory
Departments of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation,
Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, TX
David Marks, Ph.D.
Department of Psychiatry
Mount Sinai Medical Center
New York, NY
Brenna C. McDonald, PsyD
Departments of Radiology and Neurology
Indiana University School of Medicine
Indianapolis, IN
Contact information for authors
viii
Lisa M. Noll, Ph.D.
Learning Support Center for Child Psychology
Texas Children’s Hospital
Houston, TX
Thomas Novack, Ph.D.
Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
University of Alabama, Birmingham
Birmingham, AL
Sarah J. Paterson, Ph.D.
Department of Pediatrics
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA
Celiane Rey-Casserly, Ph.D.
Department of Psychiatry
Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School,
Boston
Boston, MA
Tresa Roebuck-Spencer, Ph.D., ABPP-Cn
Department of Psychology
National Rehabilitation Hospital
Washington DC
Anthony C. Ruocco, Ph.D.
Department of Psychiatry
University of Illinois at Chicago
Chicago, IL
Andrew J. Saykin, PsyD
Departments of Radiology, Neurology, and Psychiatry
Indiana University School of Medicine
Indianapolis, IN
Michael Seidenberg, Ph.D.
Department of Psychology
Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science
North Chicago, IL
Margaret Semrud-Clikeman, Ph.D.
Departments of Psychology & Psychiatry
Michigan State University
East Lansing, MI
Elsa Shapiro, Ph.D.
Pediatric Clinical Neuroscience
University of Minnesota Medical Center
Minneapolis, MN
Mark Sherer, Ph.D., ABPP-Cn
TIRR Memorial Hermann
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston, TX
Abigail B. Sivan, Ph.D.
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Science
Feinberg School of Medicine
Northwestern University
Chicago, IL
Elizabeth P. Sparrow, Ph.D.
Sparrow Neuropsychology, P.A.
Durham, NC
Gregory M. Stasi, Ph.D.
Rush Neurobehavioral Center
Skokie, IL
Tyler J. Story, Ph.D.
Division of Neurology
Duke University Medical Center
Durham, NC
H. Lee Swanson, Ph.D.
Graduate School of Education
University of California-Riverside
Riverside, CA
Amy Szarkowski, Ph.D.
Deaf and Hard of Hearing Program
Children’s Hospital Boston
Waltham, MA
Lori G. Tall, PsyD
Rush Neurobehavioral Center
Skokie, IL
Heather B. Taylor, Ph.D.
The University of Texas Health Science Center
Department of Pediatrics
Children’s Learning Institute
Houston, TX
Joey Trampush, M.A.
Department of Psychology
CUNY Graduate Center
New York, NY
Christine Trask, Ph.D.
Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior
Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown
University
Providence, RI
Geoffrey Tremont, Ph.D.
Neuropsychology Program, Rhode Island Hospital
Providence, RI
Contact information for authors
ix
Marie Van Tubbergen, Ph.D.
Department of Physical Medicine and
Rehabilitation
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI
Clemente Vega
Yale University School of Medicine
Department of Neurosurgery
New Haven, CT
Seth Warschausky, Ph.D.
Department of Physical Medicine and
Rehabilitation
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI
Desiree White, Ph.D.
Department of Psychology
Washington University
St. Louis, MO
John Williamson, Ph.D.
Department of Neurology and
Rehabilitation
University of Illinois at Chicago
Chicago, IL
Julie M. Wolf, Ph.D.
Yale Child Study Center
New Haven, CT
Keith Owen Yeates, Ph.D.
The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s
Hospital
Columbus, OH
Michael Zaccariello, Ph.D.
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology
Mayo Clinic
Alexandra Zagoloff, M.S.
Department of Psychology
Illinois Institute of Technology
Chicago, IL
Kathy Zebracki, Ph.D.
Department of Behavioral Sciences,
Rush University Medical Center,
Pediatric Psychologist,
Shriners Hospital for Children,
Chicago, IL
Frank Zelko, Ph.D.
Neuropsychology Service, Children’s Memorial Hospital
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science
Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University
Chicago, IL
Richard Ziegler, Ph.D.
Pediatric Clinical Neuroscience
University of Minnesota Medical Center
Minneapolis, MN


Principles and Practice of Lifespan Developmental Neuropsychology 1st Edition – Section I

Chapter 1

Theory and models A lifespan review of developmental neuroanatomy

The structure of the brain is in constant flux from the moment of its conception to the firing of its final nerve
impulse in death. As the brain develops, functional networks are created that underlie our cognitive and emotional capacities. Our technologies for evaluating these functional systems have changed over time as well, evolving from lesion-based case studies, neuropathological analyses, in vivo neurophysiological techniques (e.g. electroencephalography), and in vivo structural evaluation (CT scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)), to in vivo functional methodologies (functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET)).

And with these rapidly developing technologies, we are able to more thoroughly test some of the earlier hypotheses that were developed about the nature and function of the brain. Although attempts to localize mental processes to
the brain may be traced to antiquity, the phrenologists Gall and Spurtzheim may have initiated the first modern attempt, by hypothesizing that language is confined to the frontal lobes [1]. While these early hypotheses
were largely ignored as phrenology fell in ill-repute, they were resurrected in the early 1860s by Paul
Broca, who, inspired by a discussion of the phrenologists’ work, sparked a renewed interest in localization of
brain function with his seminal case studies on aphasia [2].

Broca’s explorations were among the earliest examples of lateralized language dominance. Recently, high-resolution structural MRI was applied to preserved specimens taken from two of Broca’s patients, to examine the localization of damage on the surface and interior of the brains. This modern technology revealed extensive damage in the medial regions of the brain and highlighted inconsistencies with previous hypotheses in the area of the brain identified by Broca, which is now identified as Broca’s area [3].

This is interesting, both from a historical perspective and also with respect to our current understandings of the brain systems involved in the behavioral presentations Broca described (beyond the articulatory functions of the inferior frontal gyrus); specifically the extent of behavioral changes identified by Broca is now more accurately
reflected by the apparent neuropathology. A contemporary of Broca’s, John Hughlings Jackson, offered a different perspective regarding localization.

While Jackson had no problem with the notion of probabilistic behavior profiles with specific brain lesions (e.g. a left inferior frontal lesion most likely will affect expressive speech), he did not agree with the prevailing idea at the time that these lesion/behavior observations represented a confined center of function [4]. Jackson proposed a vertical organization of brain functions, with each level (e.g. brain stem, motor and sensory cortex, and prefrontal cortex) containing a representation, or component of the function of interest.

Though this idea was at the periphery of opinion at the time, when strict localizationist theory was gaining
momentum, it has come to form the basis of modern thought regarding the mechanisms of brain and behavior
relationships. Holes and gaps in the models of strict localization of behaviors to specific, contained brain regions became more salient to the mainstream neuroscience community over time (cf. the disrepute of phrenology and conflicting findings from lesion/behavior studies). In response, Karl Lashley’s search for the memory engram typified another era in the exploration of brain–behavior relationships.

Using an experimental approach rather than the classic case study method, Lashley, famously unable to localize
memory function in rats (through progressive brain ablation), introduced the constructs of equipotentiality and
mass action [5]. Equipotentiality is the concept that all brain tissue is equally capable of taking over the function
of any other brain tissue (demonstrated in the visual cortex) and, relatedly, mass action references the idea
that the behavioral impact of a lesion is dependent on its size, not its location………

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